F.A.Q - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

MOST COMMON BATTERY SERVICE QUESTIONS

Q : Why does my battery in my car keep dying?


A: Having a dead car battery is always frustrating. Having a series of dead batteries, though, is a clear sign that there’s a deeper issue. Some possible reasons for dead car batteries include a faulty charging system (alternator) or extremes in hot and cold temperatures. Taking your car for frequent short drives can also cause the battery life to diminish considerably.




Q : What can drain a battery when it’s off?


A: There are a number of things that can drain your vehicle battery life, even when the car is turned off. Some of the major ones to consider include bad charging, due to a faulty alternator; a defective alternator diode; or a battery that’s simply very old and no longer able to hold much of a charge. Any of these can cause the battery to die, even when you’re not running the vehicle.




Q : Is it a dead battery or alternator?


A: Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether you have a bad battery or a bad alternator. Certainly, if you have a series of failed batteries all in a row, that points to the alternator. Additionally, try jumping your car. If the battery dies while the car is still running, that means the alternator isn’t doing its job properly, and needs to be repaired or replaced.




Q : Can a car battery recharge itself?


A: While car batteries don’t recharge themselves, your car does have a part called the alternator, which exists to help your battery maintain its charge. If you have multiple battery failures, it could be that the real problem is with the alternator. Reach out to King County Collision & Repair to schedule a service appointment and get your alternator diagnosed and repaired as it’s needed.




Q : How can you tell if a battery is good or not?


A: There are a number of clear indicators that your car battery is bad, or is about to go bad. These include an engine that cranks but doesn’t start; a car that won’t crank or start at all; or a car that starts fine one day but has trouble the next. Additionally, if you’ve had to jump your car a lot, or find that cold cranking is hard work, that points to a potential battery issue.




Q : What is the average life of a car battery?


A: On average, a vehicle battery will last you anywhere from four to six years. There are several factors that can impact your battery’s lifespan, including the type of vehicle, the weather conditions, and your own driving habits. If your battery goes bad or starts giving you trouble, make an appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have it replaced.




Q : Is my battery dead if the lights turn on?


A: If your lights are turning on, then your car battery probably isn’t dead—but it may be on its way out. If those lights are dimmer than usual, that’s a telltale sign of pending battery failure. And of course, difficulty getting the vehicle to crank or to start points to a looming battery failure, regardless of whether or not the lights still come on.




Q : What does it mean when you turn your car on and it clicks?


A: If you turn on your engine and you hear a series of rapid clicks, that typically means that the battery is either dead or close to it. If you hear one loud click, that’s more likely the cause of a bad starter. In either case, it’s wise to make a service appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have the problem diagnosed and corrected.





MOST COMMON BRAKE SERVICE QUESTIONS

Q: What causes brake noise?


A: Brake squeals are caused by the brake pads vibrating, spring clips losing tension or poor brake pad fit on the caliper. If you hear a grinding noise when you brake, you’re likely hearing the metal backing of your brake pad contacting your rotor because the brake pad material has completely worn away.




Q: I hear a grinding noise when I step on the brakes. Should I be concerned?


A: Whether it’s a squeal or a grind, brake noise means the brake system needs some attention. Bring your vehicle to any of our stores, and we’ll be happy to take a look.




Q: My brake pedal feels spongy. Why?


A: If you have to press the brake pedal farther or harder than usual to stop, there could be a hydraulic or mechanical brake problem. Bring your car in for a check as soon as you can.




Q: How often should I change my brake fluid?


A: The most accurate answer is as often as your owner’s manual suggests. Some manufacturers recommend new brake fluid as often as every two years. You also need to change your brake fluid if it contains too much copper. Copper is measured in parts per million, and the industry-accepted limit is 200 ppm. Any more than that and the fluid no longer meets design specifications and should be replaced. We check to make sure your brake fluid is in good shape during our Courtesy Check. There is no charge, but it does take a bit more time.




Q: The car pulls to the right or left when I step on the brakes. Why?


A: You may have a hydraulic brake problem, a mechanical problem, or a steering or chassis issue. A thorough inspection will tell us for sure.




Q: Do I have to change my brake fluid?


A: You don’t have to change your brake fluid, but consider this: When the brake fluid shows signs of high levels of copper content, the additives in the brake fluid are breaking down. This increases acid levels, and causes erosion of parts and possible damage to Anti-Lock Brake System components. Today’s anti-lock brake systems are expensive – some parts cost thousands of dollars, not including labor. Changing your brake fluid protects this investment.




Q: My car shakes when I hit the brakes. What's going on?


A: It’s possibly a sign that your rotors need attention, but we’ll know for sure once we take a look.




Q: I only have 10,000 miles on my car and my brakes are squeaking. Do I need new brakes already?


A: Probably not, but whether it’s a squeal or a grind, brake noise means the brake system needs some attention. Bring your vehicle to any of our stores, and we’ll be happy to take a look.




Q: How long do brake pads and rotors last?


A: All brake pads and rotors wear down. The rate at which this happens depends on your driving style. Cars that drive in town with lots of stop-and-gos will consume brake friction material much faster than cars that drive primarily on highways. Vehicle loads are the other factor. The heavier your car is, the more braking power it requires to stop.




Q : What are brake pads?


A: Brake pads work with the brake caliper to stop the spinning motion of your wheels. The caliper squeezes the pads together, creating friction between the pads and the brake rotors. The pads and rotors then work together to stop your car’s wheels. When you apply pressure to your brakes and hear a squeak, it’s most likely your brake pads warning you they may need to be replaced.




Q : What’s a rotor?


A: Brake rotors, also called brake discs, are a key part of your car’s braking system, As the brake pads clamp down on them, the applied pressure will stop the spinning of your wheels.




Q : How should brake pedals feel?


A: When you apply your brakes, they should feel firm throughout the process, and the harder you push, the firmer your brakes should feel. If your brakes feel spongy when pressure is applied, then you should have them evaluated by a professional mechanic. Spongy brakes could be a sign of a problem in the hydraulic system, such as failing calipers or a weak flex line.




Q : What is a brake system flush?


A: A brake system flush is when existing brake fluid is removed and new fluid is added to the hydraulic system. This ensures proper performance and increased life span of your brakes.





MOST COMMON COLLISION & REPAIR QUESTIONS

Q : Why does my battery in my car keep dying?


A: Having a dead car battery is always frustrating. Having a series of dead batteries, though, is a clear sign that there’s a deeper issue. Some possible reasons for dead car batteries include a faulty charging system (alternator) or extremes in hot and cold temperatures. Taking your car for frequent short drives can also cause the battery life to diminish considerably.




Q : What can drain a battery when it’s off?


A: There are a number of things that can drain your vehicle battery life, even when the car is turned off. Some of the major ones to consider include bad charging, due to a faulty alternator; a defective alternator diode; or a battery that’s simply very old and no longer able to hold much of a charge. Any of these can cause the battery to die, even when you’re not running the vehicle.




Q : Is it a dead battery or alternator?


A: Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether you have a bad battery or a bad alternator. Certainly, if you have a series of failed batteries all in a row, that points to the alternator. Additionally, try jumping your car. If the battery dies while the car is still running, that means the alternator isn’t doing its job properly, and needs to be repaired or replaced.




Q : Can a car battery recharge itself?


A: While car batteries don’t recharge themselves, your car does have a part called the alternator, which exists to help your battery maintain its charge. If you have multiple battery failures, it could be that the real problem is with the alternator. Reach out to King County Collision & Repair to schedule a service appointment and get your alternator diagnosed and repaired as it’s needed.




Q : How can you tell if a battery is good or not?


A: There are a number of clear indicators that your car battery is bad, or is about to go bad. These include an engine that cranks but doesn’t start; a car that won’t crank or start at all; or a car that starts fine one day but has trouble the next. Additionally, if you’ve had to jump your car a lot, or find that cold cranking is hard work, that points to a potential battery issue.




Q : What is the average life of a car battery?


A: On average, a vehicle battery will last you anywhere from four to six years. There are several factors that can impact your battery’s lifespan, including the type of vehicle, the weather conditions, and your own driving habits. If your battery goes bad or starts giving you trouble, make an appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have it replaced.




Q : Is my battery dead if the lights turn on?


A: If your lights are turning on, then your car battery probably isn’t dead—but it may be on its way out. If those lights are dimmer than usual, that’s a telltale sign of pending battery failure. And of course, difficulty getting the vehicle to crank or to start points to a looming battery failure, regardless of whether or not the lights still come on.




Q : What does it mean when you turn your car on and it clicks?


A: If you turn on your engine and you hear a series of rapid clicks, that typically means that the battery is either dead or close to it. If you hear one loud click, that’s more likely the cause of a bad starter. In either case, it’s wise to make a service appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have the problem diagnosed and corrected.





MOST COMMON DENT REMOVAL QUESTIONS

Q: Why won't the shop give me an estimate over the phone or from an email with a picture?


A: Without seeing the car in person, it's nearly impossible to provide an accurate quote. It is very common for vehicles to require additional prep work.




Q: Do I have to make an appointment for an estimate?


A: Appointments are not necessary, but you can still schedule one for your convenience by using our online appointment software..




Q: Will the price I pay be the same as the estimate? No surprises?


A: Yes. The price you pay could be higher than your initial estimate if hidden damage is discovered during the repair and/or refinishing process or if the cost of parts increases. This is extremely uncommon; however, when it does occur, we will always call to discuss your options and offer you the opportunity to come in and see the repair area first hand.





MOST COMMON MUFFLER & EXHAUST QUESTIONS

Q: What causes brake noise?


A: Brake squeals are caused by the brake pads vibrating, spring clips losing tension or poor brake pad fit on the caliper. If you hear a grinding noise when you brake, you’re likely hearing the metal backing of your brake pad contacting your rotor because the brake pad material has completely worn away.




Q: I hear a grinding noise when I step on the brakes. Should I be concerned?


A: Whether it’s a squeal or a grind, brake noise means the brake system needs some attention. Bring your vehicle to any of our stores, and we’ll be happy to take a look.




Q: My brake pedal feels spongy. Why?


A: If you have to press the brake pedal farther or harder than usual to stop, there could be a hydraulic or mechanical brake problem. Bring your car in for a check as soon as you can.




Q: How often should I change my brake fluid?


A: The most accurate answer is as often as your owner’s manual suggests. Some manufacturers recommend new brake fluid as often as every two years. You also need to change your brake fluid if it contains too much copper. Copper is measured in parts per million, and the industry-accepted limit is 200 ppm. Any more than that and the fluid no longer meets design specifications and should be replaced. We check to make sure your brake fluid is in good shape during our Courtesy Check. There is no charge, but it does take a bit more time.




Q: The car pulls to the right or left when I step on the brakes. Why?


A: You may have a hydraulic brake problem, a mechanical problem, or a steering or chassis issue. A thorough inspection will tell us for sure.




Q: Do I have to change my brake fluid?


A: You don’t have to change your brake fluid, but consider this: When the brake fluid shows signs of high levels of copper content, the additives in the brake fluid are breaking down. This increases acid levels, and causes erosion of parts and possible damage to Anti-Lock Brake System components. Today’s anti-lock brake systems are expensive – some parts cost thousands of dollars, not including labor. Changing your brake fluid protects this investment.




Q: My car shakes when I hit the brakes. What's going on?


A: It’s possibly a sign that your rotors need attention, but we’ll know for sure once we take a look.




Q: I only have 10,000 miles on my car and my brakes are squeaking. Do I need new brakes already?


A: Probably not, but whether it’s a squeal or a grind, brake noise means the brake system needs some attention. Bring your vehicle to any of our stores, and we’ll be happy to take a look.




Q: How long do brake pads and rotors last?


A: All brake pads and rotors wear down. The rate at which this happens depends on your driving style. Cars that drive in town with lots of stop-and-gos will consume brake friction material much faster than cars that drive primarily on highways. Vehicle loads are the other factor. The heavier your car is, the more braking power it requires to stop.




Q : What are brake pads?


A: Brake pads work with the brake caliper to stop the spinning motion of your wheels. The caliper squeezes the pads together, creating friction between the pads and the brake rotors. The pads and rotors then work together to stop your car’s wheels. When you apply pressure to your brakes and hear a squeak, it’s most likely your brake pads warning you they may need to be replaced.




Q : What’s a rotor?


A: Brake rotors, also called brake discs, are a key part of your car’s braking system, As the brake pads clamp down on them, the applied pressure will stop the spinning of your wheels.




Q : How should brake pedals feel?


A: When you apply your brakes, they should feel firm throughout the process, and the harder you push, the firmer your brakes should feel. If your brakes feel spongy when pressure is applied, then you should have them evaluated by a professional mechanic. Spongy brakes could be a sign of a problem in the hydraulic system, such as failing calipers or a weak flex line.




Q : What is a brake system flush?


A: A brake system flush is when existing brake fluid is removed and new fluid is added to the hydraulic system. This ensures proper performance and increased life span of your brakes.





MOST COMMON OIL CHANGE QUESTIONS

Q : Why does my battery in my car keep dying?


A: Having a dead car battery is always frustrating. Having a series of dead batteries, though, is a clear sign that there’s a deeper issue. Some possible reasons for dead car batteries include a faulty charging system (alternator) or extremes in hot and cold temperatures. Taking your car for frequent short drives can also cause the battery life to diminish considerably.




Q : What can drain a battery when it’s off?


A: There are a number of things that can drain your vehicle battery life, even when the car is turned off. Some of the major ones to consider include bad charging, due to a faulty alternator; a defective alternator diode; or a battery that’s simply very old and no longer able to hold much of a charge. Any of these can cause the battery to die, even when you’re not running the vehicle.




Q : Is it a dead battery or alternator?


A: Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether you have a bad battery or a bad alternator. Certainly, if you have a series of failed batteries all in a row, that points to the alternator. Additionally, try jumping your car. If the battery dies while the car is still running, that means the alternator isn’t doing its job properly, and needs to be repaired or replaced.




Q : Can a car battery recharge itself?


A: While car batteries don’t recharge themselves, your car does have a part called the alternator, which exists to help your battery maintain its charge. If you have multiple battery failures, it could be that the real problem is with the alternator. Reach out to King County Collision & Repair to schedule a service appointment and get your alternator diagnosed and repaired as it’s needed.




Q : How can you tell if a battery is good or not?


A: There are a number of clear indicators that your car battery is bad, or is about to go bad. These include an engine that cranks but doesn’t start; a car that won’t crank or start at all; or a car that starts fine one day but has trouble the next. Additionally, if you’ve had to jump your car a lot, or find that cold cranking is hard work, that points to a potential battery issue.




Q : What is the average life of a car battery?


A: On average, a vehicle battery will last you anywhere from four to six years. There are several factors that can impact your battery’s lifespan, including the type of vehicle, the weather conditions, and your own driving habits. If your battery goes bad or starts giving you trouble, make an appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have it replaced.




Q : Is my battery dead if the lights turn on?


A: If your lights are turning on, then your car battery probably isn’t dead—but it may be on its way out. If those lights are dimmer than usual, that’s a telltale sign of pending battery failure. And of course, difficulty getting the vehicle to crank or to start points to a looming battery failure, regardless of whether or not the lights still come on.




Q : What does it mean when you turn your car on and it clicks?


A: If you turn on your engine and you hear a series of rapid clicks, that typically means that the battery is either dead or close to it. If you hear one loud click, that’s more likely the cause of a bad starter. In either case, it’s wise to make a service appointment with King County Collision & Repair to have the problem diagnosed and corrected.





MOST COMMON ESTIMATE QUESTIONS

Estimate F.A.Q's

Q: Why won't the shop give me an estimate over the phone or from an email with a picture?


A: Without seeing the car in person, it's nearly impossible to provide an accurate quote. It is very common for vehicles to require additional prep work.




Q: Do I have to make an appointment for an estimate?


A: Appointments are not necessary, but you can still schedule one for your convenience by using our online appointment software..




Q: Will the price I pay be the same as the estimate? No surprises?


A: Yes. The price you pay could be higher than your initial estimate if hidden damage is discovered during the repair and/or refinishing process or if the cost of parts increases. This is extremely uncommon; however, when it does occur, we will always call to discuss your options and offer you the opportunity to come in and see the repair area first hand.





MOST COMMON PRICING QUESTIONS

Pricing F.A.Q's

Q: Why won't the shop give me an estimate over the phone or from an email with a picture?


A: Without seeing the car in person, it's nearly impossible to provide an accurate quote. It is very common for vehicles to require additional prep work.




Q: Do I have to make an appointment for an estimate?


A: Appointments are not necessary, but you can still schedule one for your convenience by using our online appointment software..




Q: Will the price I pay be the same as the estimate? No surprises?


A: Yes. The price you pay could be higher than your initial estimate if hidden damage is discovered during the repair and/or refinishing process or if the cost of parts increases. This is extremely uncommon; however, when it does occur, we will always call to discuss your options and offer you the opportunity to come in and see the repair area first hand.





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Policies and Terms last updated on 10/09/2020